Professions Australia


Professions Australia aims to be the unifying voice of associations representing the professions in Australia. Formed in 1971 by Councils for Professions in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia, the federal Council for Professions today represents more than 20 professional associations which in turn serve more than 420,000 professionals. Incorporated as a public company in 1994, the state councils became branches – by that time including the Australian Capital Territory and Tasmania – and in 2002 registered a business name in every state and territory to officially become the Australian Council of Professions Limited, trading as Professions Australia.

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Researching the health information workforce


In 2013, Health Workforce Australia recognised the need to delineate the health information workforce (HIW), and improve data collection processes for this workforce. Existing workforce estimates from sources such as the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) census data and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) are unreliable and do not examine all occupations within this workforce. A focus group was held at the 2015 Health Information Workforce Summit to examine the need for a minimum dataset to allow data collection and monitoring on this workforce. Nine participants unanimously agreed upon the need to formally monitor and evaluate the HIW by collecting current workforce data. A national census of the HIW would capture the data to provide evidence for increased funding and support for workforce supply and configuration.

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To improve communication – take your medication. The Quality Conversation No. 12


Sitting in on a quality committee meeting recently, I wondered if all of us working in aged, community and acute care are sometimes a little too smart for our own good. Of course, “communication” was the number one problem for consumers – as it had been for the past year, and probably way before that. And it’s not only consumers who raise these issues; staff also consistently complain that they are not adequately informed about changes affecting them, often scuttling changes out of frustration at not being in the loop.

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What to expect out of the 2016 IFHIMA Congress


THE FAMILIAR PHRASE “think globally, act locally” urges people to consider the health of the entire planet and to take action in their own communities and cities. The rapid spread of epidemics such as Avian flu, Ebola, HIV, and the latest threat of Zika to pregnant women and their unborn children remind us how small the world is. This also underscores the importance of embracing global standards to facilitate information collection and data sharing to advance health and wellness.

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The Djerriwarrh Health Services clinical governance failure, Part Two. What do the good boards and executives do? The Quality Conversation No. 11


In the last Quality Conversation, I discussed the clinical governance issues that arose from the Djerriwarrh Health Services clinical governance failure case in Victoria in 2015. In this Conversation I ask: If that’s what clinical governance failure looks like, what are high performing boards and executives doing differently?

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Another inquiry into poor care; new health service – same lessons: the Quality Conversation No. 10


October 2015 brought sombre news for Australian healthcare – another health service inquiry into poor care, this one concerning the deaths and stillbirths of a number of babies in a Victorian regional hospital. It’s caused me to reflect again about what is at the heart of our failure to guarantee safe, quality care for our consumers. An extract from the 16/10/15 Djerriwarrh Health Services (DjHS) media release1 stated: ‘A comprehensive, independent investigation of 11 cases at DjHS between 2013 and early this year found a series of failures and deficiencies may have contributed to the deaths of up to seven babies...Djerriwarrh has, in consultation with the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services, initiated all possible measures to reinforce the safety of its maternity and newborn services.’

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Clinical analysis of coded data and the effect on quality of care: updated


Detailed activity and cost data across the continuum of care are the essential underpinning ingredients in the management of healthcare services in an ABF environment. While the best value for money in the delivery of healthcare services must be ensured, service delivery decisions cannot be based on cost alone. This updated article outlines the importance of the role of the clinical analyst in the review of costed patient-level data from ABF systems. It reviews the impact that data can have on ensuring the maintenance of quality clinical care within an era of fiscal regulation, through the identification, measurement and analysis of clinical care utilisation profiles against best practice. It also outlines a system maturity model for healthcare services using ABF systems and relates these milestones along a data-to-wisdom continuum.

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